Photographing Fungi in The Rainforest of Southeast Asia | PhotoTravelAsia

Photographing Fungi in Rainforest of Southeast Asia | PhotoTravelAsia

We have encountered fungi in our lives either through our favorite cream of mushroom soup or the molds that grow on a piece of stale bread. Fungus is a simple fast-growing type of organisms such as mushroom and mold. While some fungi are edible, others can be poisonous or deadly. Fungi come in various colors, shapes, and sizes. I spend many years hunting and photographing fungi in Southeast Asia.

Photographing Fungi in Southeast Asia | PhotoTravelAsia
Fungi growing on a piece of dead branch that we discovered while hiking on the forest trail. Picture was taken in Gunung Gede National Park Indonesia.

Photographing fungi in the Rainforest of Southeast Asia in the wet season. Equipped with simple photographic equipment and a tripod, I enjoyed photographing fungi in Southeast Asia. 

Here are images of different fungi from Indonesia and Singapore.

Photographing Fungi in Southeast Asia
Fungi of Cookenia family has attractive colour. Picture was taken in the rain forest of Ujung Kulon National Park, Indonesia
Fungi Nature PHotography SIngapore--3
An entire colony of Bracket Fungi (Ganodermataceae family) growing on dead tree trunks in the rain forest. Picture was taken in Bukit Timah Nature Reserve Singapore
Fungi Nature PHotography SIngapore--4
Bird ‘s Nest Fungi shaped like a bird nest usually growing on the forest floor. The hollow cup containing small “seeds”-which are called spores, resembling a small bird’s nest with eggs. The spores are easily splashed out of the cup by rain drops onto the surroundings. Picture was taken in Bukit Timah Nature Reserve Singapore
Fungi Nature PHotography SIngapore-1-2
Marasmius. This is one of the small mushrooms with the stalk as thin as our hair. Notice that two of them are growing on dead leaves on the forest floor. Picture was taken in Bukit Timah Nature Reserve Singapore.
Fungi Nature PHotography SIngapore-1
The Stink Horn fungi (Phallaceae family) have unpleasant smell that attracts flies and subsequently help to disperse the spores. Notice the white “veil” growing under the cap. Picture was taken in Singapore Botanic Gardens

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